Recent Storm Damage Posts

The Damage Water Causes Can Be Permanent If Not Treated Properly

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

The kind of damage water can create in the home is staggering, and if not dealt with promptly, it may result in permanent issues for the homeowner. Excess moisture is a constant enemy in buildings, seeping in around windows, through the HVAC system, from the plumbing, and even through the air every time a door is opened. As long as the home is maintained well, this isn’t a problem, but a flood or burst pipe can quickly change the situation.

What damage can water cause in the home?

Excess moisture is unique in its destructive capabilities. Not only can it create significant and immediate physical devastation, it can make the home a hotspot for bacteria, viruses and molds. Floods are particularly troublesome, as they can fill the home with contaminated water.

When a flood slams into a building, it gathers in the lowest rooms, soaking everything in its wake. The flood brings in many hazards with it, sometimes including wildlife, chemical runoff, and various pathogens. For this reason, untrained people are strongly cautioned not to enter a building that has been wracked by a flood, as they may be bit or stung by dangerous wildlife. Chemical runoff includes fertilizers, road oils, and precipitants sitting on rooftops. This can make the fluid highly toxic and leave stains and odors.

But perhaps the most concerning damage water creates is pathological. Floods pick up fluid from rivers, lakes and ditches, and this fluid may contain cholera, hepatitis, dysentery and salmonella. It can wash in molds as well, turning the home into a biological hazard. What makes microbes especially dangerous in the home is that most houses are filled with organic materials, and these provide ideal conditions for microbes to grow. Drywall, carpets, upholstery, and wood are among the organic materials microbes may latch onto, and within 48 hours, any material that has been soaked through with contaminated fluid will usually be beyond salvaging. And even if the fluid is mostly benign, the withering exposure to moisture can yellow drywall and erode its integrity, and cause wood to warp.

There is no getting around it, the kind of damage water can produce is staggering, and it’s capable of leaving a building in a condemnable condition.

That’s why restoration firms are equipped to respond to disasters day and night, and are ready to treat floods and plumbing mishaps right away. Certified restoration firms, like those trained through the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC), have the skills and tools needed to deal with all kinds of moisture related disasters. Within a few days, restoration firms can remove all signs of excess moisture, saving sensitive materials, drying out the home, and destroying any signs of mold and microbes.

Floods and plumbing disasters cannot be ignored, and when they do emerge, the only way to deal with them safely is with a certified professional’s help.

www.IICRC.org

What to do in a Flood

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgment about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.

After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

Food Safety Tips

7/17/2018 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

7/17/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Food Safety Tips

3/22/2018 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the North Georgia mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Ellijay who experienced flooding in early August, or the people in Blairsville who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

3/22/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Home & Garden Show 2016

7/31/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties had so much fun at the Home & Garden Show in Hiawassee hosted at the Events Center at Fieldstone! We were able to meet customers and give them information they never knew regarding what was lurking in their HVAC duct systems and information regarding mold due to flooding among so much more! Thank you to everyone who came out to see us! If you didn't get a chance to come out or have questions for us, feel free to contact SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties and our office will be happy to answer any questions you may have any kinds of issues you are experiencing. SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties is always here to help!

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/31/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

National Preparedness Month

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Flood Safety Tips

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

What to Do in A Flood!

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgment about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.

After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 

The Damage Water Causes Can Be Permanent If Not Treated Properly

6/25/2017 (Permalink)

The kind of damage water can create in the home is staggering, and if not dealt with promptly, it may result in permanent issues for the homeowner. Excess moisture is a constant enemy in buildings, seeping in around windows, through the HVAC system, from the plumbing, and even through the air every time a door is opened. As long as the home is maintained well, this isn’t a problem, but a flood or burst pipe can quickly change the situation.

What damage can water cause in the home?

Excess moisture is unique in its destructive capabilities. Not only can it create significant and immediate physical devastation, it can make the home a hotspot for bacteria, viruses and molds. Floods are particularly troublesome, as they can fill the home with contaminated water.

When a flood slams into a building, it gathers in the lowest rooms, soaking everything in its wake. The flood brings in many hazards with it, sometimes including wildlife, chemical runoff, and various pathogens. For this reason, untrained people are strongly cautioned not to enter a building that has been wracked by a flood, as they may be bit or stung by dangerous wildlife. Chemical runoff includes fertilizers, road oils, and precipitants sitting on rooftops. This can make the fluid highly toxic and leave stains and odors.

But perhaps the most concerning damage water creates is pathological. Floods pick up fluid from rivers, lakes and ditches, and this fluid may contain cholera, hepatitis, dysentery and salmonella. It can wash in molds as well, turning the home into a biological hazard. What makes microbes especially dangerous in the home is that most houses are filled with organic materials, and these provide ideal conditions for microbes to grow. Drywall, carpets, upholstery, and wood are among the organic materials microbes may latch onto, and within 48 hours, any material that has been soaked through with contaminated fluid will usually be beyond salvaging. And even if the fluid is mostly benign, the withering exposure to moisture can yellow drywall and erode its integrity, and cause wood to warp.

There is no getting around it, the kind of damage water can produce is staggering, and it’s capable of leaving a building in a condemnable condition.

That’s why restoration firms are equipped to respond to disasters day and night, and are ready to treat floods and plumbing mishaps right away. Certified restoration firms, like those trained through the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC), have the skills and tools needed to deal with all kinds of moisture related disasters. Within a few days, restoration firms can remove all signs of excess moisture, saving sensitive materials, drying out the home, and destroying any signs of mold and microbes.

Floods and plumbing disasters cannot be ignored, and when they do emerge, the only way to deal with them safely is with a certified professional’s help.

www.IICRC.org

Flood Safety Tips

3/20/2017 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

3/20/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/11/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

Home & Garden Show 2016

6/13/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Home & Garden Show 2016 RL Key and Christine Harriott

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties had so much fun at the Home & Garden Show in Hiawassee hosted at the Events Center at Fieldstone! We were able to meet customers and give them information they never knew regarding what was lurking in their HVAC duct systems and information regarding mold due to flooding among so much more! Thank you to everyone who came out to see us! If you didn't get a chance to come out or have questions for us, feel free to contact SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties and our office will be happy to answer any questions you may have any kinds of issues you are experiencing. SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties is always here to help!

Relay for Life 2016

6/13/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties had so much fun last Friday at the Relay for Life event in Blue Ridge, GA! Thank you to everyone who came out to support the cause!

What Is Relay?

  • Organized, overnight community fundraising walk
  • Teams of people camp out around a track
  • Members of each team take turns walking around the track
  • Food, games and activities provide entertainment and build camaraderie
  • Family-friendly environment for the entire community

Because it's a team event, individual participants are not required to be there the entire time. But it's so much fun, you'll find it hard to leave!

 

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration and we are an IICRC Certified Firm. We believe in continuous training: from initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

What to Do in A Flood!

6/1/2016 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgement about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.
  • After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 
  • Flood Safety Tips

    4/28/2016 (Permalink)

    Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



    Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.
  • National Preparedness Month

    4/28/2016 (Permalink)

    SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

    What does it mean to be prepared?

    For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

    For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

    For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

    Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.