Recent Storm Damage Posts

Do You Have "4" Knowledge?

3/10/2020 (Permalink)

There’s been a fire at your home or business. Once the firemen leave, your first inclination may be to go inside the structure to see what’s salvageable and start the cleaning process. But cleaning up after a fire is much more complicated than regular cleaning. It’s also very dangerous. Because once the last flame has been snuffed out, the dangers from a fire linger. 

Soot Hazards

Since fire destroys all materials, the soot that covers everything you touch and that you kick up in the air is full of toxic substances. That’s why the highly trained professionals at SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties wear heavy duty personal protection equipment (PPE) on fire mitigation jobs until all the soot is removed. Here are some of the poisons found in the soot and ashes of a building fire:

  • Mesothelioma (cancer) causing asbestos fibers from building materials
  • Carbon materials can produce carbon monoxide, ammonia, and nitrogen oxides
  • PVC can create hydrogen chloride, phosgene (used as a chemical weapon during World War I), dioxin, Refrigerant-40, bromomethane (a pesticide), etc.
  • Hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide (poisonous gasses)
  • Petroleum based items can produce formaldehyde, acrolein, furfural, cresols, and other harmful chemicals
  • Even wood smoke releases more than 100 chemicals also found in cigarette smoke

Removing the Odors

One of the main aftereffects of a fire are odors. These can be difficult to remove without professional know-how and equipment. For instance, did you know that four factors (The Four S’s) can impact the strength of fire odors? Those are:

  1. Size - The bigger the fire, the more objects have burned, and thus there’s been more smoke.
  2. Span -The longer a structure has been exposed to smoke, the more deeply odor has seeped into porous materials.
  3. Space - When a fire occurs in a smaller room, the smoke odor becomes more intense and concentrated.
  4. Stuff - Not all odors are equal. For instance, burning wood, plastic and protein, all emit different smells with varied consistency.

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties has the knowledge and equipment to eliminate the diverse and pungent odors that occur after a fire. Besides the easily accessible areas, we also examine wall cavities, duct work, crawl spaces and plumbing chases to establish whether they also suffered any smoke or fire damage. We’ll ensure that they’re cleaned, repaired and that all traces of odor are removed.

So as tempting as it may be to rush back into your fire damaged home or business once the fire is out, play it safe and call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties so that we can safely make it “Like it never even happened.”

National Preparedness Month

9/28/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, LLC, is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local emergency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

How To Choose Water Damage Restoration Services

9/27/2019 (Permalink)

When a storm leaves a home flooded, or a burst pipe causes serious issues in the house, getting water damage restoration services from a respected company should be considered a top priority. Unfortunately, this industry is not regulated, and there are people out there who pose as professionals or overstate their qualifications. Therefore, homeowners should be mindful of who they hire, as an untrained technician may do more harm than good or delay repairs, resulting in a higher degree of destruction. Before selecting a company to handle the job, keep in mind these points of emphasis:

·         Only choose certified professionals to perform water damage restoration services. Even though the industry is not regulated, technicians who have received certification have made the effort to get the best training possible, proving that they take their job seriously. Certification through the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) is a sign that a professional has received the most up to date training and is knowledgeable in the latest techniques and technologies employed during repairs. The IICRC operates a Certified Firm registrant-only database on its site, making it easy to find a local, certified professional without trouble.

·         Do not select a technician based only on the price or an insurance company’s recommendation. When possible, speak to neighbors or friends who have had to hire a technician recently and try to get a recommendation from them. Insurance companies often select a restoration company based on price, and unusually low pricing suggests the company does not use modern drying or repair methods.

·         Choose a company that offers a range of water damage restoration services. The easiest way to determine the expertise of a firm is to see if they provide a full range of options for homeowners. Mold remediation, for example, is often needed given how quickly mold can set in. This is a standard field of knowledge that advanced technicians should possess. If a company doesn’t offer mold remediation, it may not be prepared for all job settings.

·         A company that is available 24/7 is a good sign. Stay away from any firms that are reluctant to start right away. In many cases modern equipment can enable near-complete drying in as little as 36 hours, although many situations require longer. Also, a homeowner should not have to wait before repairs begin. Every minute counts when there is standing water present, and reputable professionals understand this. If a technician insists on waiting to begin the remediation portion of the loss, they probably cannot be trusted to see the job through in a reasonable timeframe.

Using these guidelines, a homeowner should be able to find a technician that can be trusted and is equipped to do the job the right way. A storm or other disaster is hard enough to deal with, and a remediation firm should do everything in its power to make this difficult process easier.

http://www.IICRC.org

What to do in a Flood

9/21/2019 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgment about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.

After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 

Don't take a chance on getting the Heebee Jeebees!

9/11/2019 (Permalink)

Household mold is fungi and is commonly referred to as mildew. You know the stuff, mostly ... you know the smell. Childhood visits to lakeside cabins, 1970s ranch home basements and even your grandma's house might bring back the memory of your mom saying "shew, it smells musty in here." Musty, is, in all actuality a word. Your mom didn't make it up. See, fungi used to be classified as plants, for years, until some scientist discovered that it acts more like an animal. So, fungi got their very own kingdom. Ah, a kingdom … "my kingdom for a horse" said Shakespeare. Seemingly simple (like the illustration from the Bard), fungi actually appears in many forms, the quickest to come to mind is usually, a mushroom. Additionally, fungi can appear as a plant parasite and damage crops. The type of fungi we are talking about today is the type which produces household, “mildewly” and musty ol mold. That culprit, though common, is actually a diverse group of organisms.   

All fungi are made up of tiny filaments called hyphae. Isn't that interes … zzzzzz …. 

The hard walls of fungus (mold) are built out of chitin, the same material that insects and arthropods have as a hard outer shell. Ok, so that's kinda cool. That totally makes the "like animals" part make more sense. Mold reproduces via microscopic particles called spores. It's largely understood that spores are irritants and can cause health effects. The fungi in the outdoors is part of the highly complex process of decomposition, you know … how fallen trees rot and stuff. Organisms such as ants will actually transport bits of fungus to their food supply (usually leaves or plants) to aid in the breakdown. Ants cannot digest cellulose. So, they use fungi kinda like we use meat tenderizer.  

Mold lives by breaking down organic material and it spreads in a largely invisible web. The type of fungi that produces household mold and woodland mushrooms do differ, however; in the way that mushrooms emerge as visible evidence of fungi, so does dusty, fuzzy looking household mold.   

The common denominator in the growth of all mold, is moisture. All this talk of fungi, mold, mildewy smells, invisible webs … it's creepy, huh? That's why, here at SERVPRO, we recommend you never try to take care of mold issues in your house by yourself. If you can see it, there is usually so much you can't see … we don't want you to even think about it.  

We offer complete mold remediation services so you don't even have to! See, now that you understand how mold works … you'll also understand that a spray bottle of bleach and some rubber gloves are only going to worsen the bigger issue. If there is mold showing on the wall, the carpet … that invisible web we talked about ... is strewn far and wide. You can't be thinking about that! You'll get the heebee jeebees! No one wants the heebee jeebees! Not to mention, if you start trying to eradicate the visible stuff and you manage to get a little of the not so visible stuff, you'll stir up the spores! So, please if you see or suspect mold in your home, or Grandma's home … give us a call! 

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

9/3/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

Flood Safety Tips

9/3/2019 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

The Damage Water Causes Can Be Permanent If Not Treated Properly

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

The kind of damage water can create in the home is staggering, and if not dealt with promptly, it may result in permanent issues for the homeowner. Excess moisture is a constant enemy in buildings, seeping in around windows, through the HVAC system, from the plumbing, and even through the air every time a door is opened. As long as the home is maintained well, this isn’t a problem, but a flood or burst pipe can quickly change the situation.

What damage can water cause in the home?

Excess moisture is unique in its destructive capabilities. Not only can it create significant and immediate physical devastation, it can make the home a hotspot for bacteria, viruses and molds. Floods are particularly troublesome, as they can fill the home with contaminated water.

When a flood slams into a building, it gathers in the lowest rooms, soaking everything in its wake. The flood brings in many hazards with it, sometimes including wildlife, chemical runoff, and various pathogens. For this reason, untrained people are strongly cautioned not to enter a building that has been wracked by a flood, as they may be bit or stung by dangerous wildlife. Chemical runoff includes fertilizers, road oils, and precipitants sitting on rooftops. This can make the fluid highly toxic and leave stains and odors.

But perhaps the most concerning damage water creates is pathological. Floods pick up fluid from rivers, lakes and ditches, and this fluid may contain cholera, hepatitis, dysentery and salmonella. It can wash in molds as well, turning the home into a biological hazard. What makes microbes especially dangerous in the home is that most houses are filled with organic materials, and these provide ideal conditions for microbes to grow. Drywall, carpets, upholstery, and wood are among the organic materials microbes may latch onto, and within 48 hours, any material that has been soaked through with contaminated fluid will usually be beyond salvaging. And even if the fluid is mostly benign, the withering exposure to moisture can yellow drywall and erode its integrity, and cause wood to warp.

There is no getting around it, the kind of damage water can produce is staggering, and it’s capable of leaving a building in a condemnable condition.

That’s why restoration firms are equipped to respond to disasters day and night, and are ready to treat floods and plumbing mishaps right away. Certified restoration firms, like those trained through the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC), have the skills and tools needed to deal with all kinds of moisture related disasters. Within a few days, restoration firms can remove all signs of excess moisture, saving sensitive materials, drying out the home, and destroying any signs of mold and microbes.

Floods and plumbing disasters cannot be ignored, and when they do emerge, the only way to deal with them safely is with a certified professional’s help.

www.IICRC.org

What to do in a Flood

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgment about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.

After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

Food Safety Tips

7/17/2018 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

7/17/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Food Safety Tips

3/22/2018 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the North Georgia mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Ellijay who experienced flooding in early August, or the people in Blairsville who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

3/22/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Home & Garden Show 2016

7/31/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties had so much fun at the Home & Garden Show in Hiawassee hosted at the Events Center at Fieldstone! We were able to meet customers and give them information they never knew regarding what was lurking in their HVAC duct systems and information regarding mold due to flooding among so much more! Thank you to everyone who came out to see us! If you didn't get a chance to come out or have questions for us, feel free to contact SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties and our office will be happy to answer any questions you may have any kinds of issues you are experiencing. SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties is always here to help!

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/31/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

National Preparedness Month

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

Flood Safety Tips

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

What to Do in A Flood!

7/28/2017 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgment about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.

After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 

The Damage Water Causes Can Be Permanent If Not Treated Properly

6/25/2017 (Permalink)

The kind of damage water can create in the home is staggering, and if not dealt with promptly, it may result in permanent issues for the homeowner. Excess moisture is a constant enemy in buildings, seeping in around windows, through the HVAC system, from the plumbing, and even through the air every time a door is opened. As long as the home is maintained well, this isn’t a problem, but a flood or burst pipe can quickly change the situation.

What damage can water cause in the home?

Excess moisture is unique in its destructive capabilities. Not only can it create significant and immediate physical devastation, it can make the home a hotspot for bacteria, viruses and molds. Floods are particularly troublesome, as they can fill the home with contaminated water.

When a flood slams into a building, it gathers in the lowest rooms, soaking everything in its wake. The flood brings in many hazards with it, sometimes including wildlife, chemical runoff, and various pathogens. For this reason, untrained people are strongly cautioned not to enter a building that has been wracked by a flood, as they may be bit or stung by dangerous wildlife. Chemical runoff includes fertilizers, road oils, and precipitants sitting on rooftops. This can make the fluid highly toxic and leave stains and odors.

But perhaps the most concerning damage water creates is pathological. Floods pick up fluid from rivers, lakes and ditches, and this fluid may contain cholera, hepatitis, dysentery and salmonella. It can wash in molds as well, turning the home into a biological hazard. What makes microbes especially dangerous in the home is that most houses are filled with organic materials, and these provide ideal conditions for microbes to grow. Drywall, carpets, upholstery, and wood are among the organic materials microbes may latch onto, and within 48 hours, any material that has been soaked through with contaminated fluid will usually be beyond salvaging. And even if the fluid is mostly benign, the withering exposure to moisture can yellow drywall and erode its integrity, and cause wood to warp.

There is no getting around it, the kind of damage water can produce is staggering, and it’s capable of leaving a building in a condemnable condition.

That’s why restoration firms are equipped to respond to disasters day and night, and are ready to treat floods and plumbing mishaps right away. Certified restoration firms, like those trained through the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC), have the skills and tools needed to deal with all kinds of moisture related disasters. Within a few days, restoration firms can remove all signs of excess moisture, saving sensitive materials, drying out the home, and destroying any signs of mold and microbes.

Floods and plumbing disasters cannot be ignored, and when they do emerge, the only way to deal with them safely is with a certified professional’s help.

www.IICRC.org

Flood Safety Tips

3/20/2017 (Permalink)

Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.

National Preparedness Month

3/20/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

What does it mean to be prepared?

For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.

When Storms or Floods hit, SERVPRO is ready!

7/11/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams http://www.SERVPROuniontownsfanningilmercounties.com/storm-flooding-restoration that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 706-896-1880

As a trusted leader in the restoration industry, SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties provides 24-hour residential and commercial services. As a locally owned and operated business, we’re dedicated to being faster to any size disaster, with the training, equipment, and expertise to handle your restoration and cleaning needs.

Home & Garden Show 2016

6/13/2016 (Permalink)

RL Key and Christine Harriott

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties had so much fun at the Home & Garden Show in Hiawassee hosted at the Events Center at Fieldstone! We were able to meet customers and give them information they never knew regarding what was lurking in their HVAC duct systems and information regarding mold due to flooding among so much more! Thank you to everyone who came out to see us! If you didn't get a chance to come out or have questions for us, feel free to contact SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties and our office will be happy to answer any questions you may have any kinds of issues you are experiencing. SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties is always here to help!

Relay for Life 2016

6/13/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin and Gilmer Counties had so much fun last Friday at the Relay for Life event in Blue Ridge, GA! Thank you to everyone who came out to support the cause!

What Is Relay?

  • Organized, overnight community fundraising walk
  • Teams of people camp out around a track
  • Members of each team take turns walking around the track
  • Food, games and activities provide entertainment and build camaraderie
  • Family-friendly environment for the entire community

Because it's a team event, individual participants are not required to be there the entire time. But it's so much fun, you'll find it hard to leave!

 

SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration and we are an IICRC Certified Firm. We believe in continuous training: from initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

What to Do in A Flood!

6/1/2016 (Permalink)

Floods are one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States, causing more damage than any other weather-related disaster.  The location of your home or business has little to do with your risk factor for flooding.  Just because you haven’t experienced a flood in the past, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future.   According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), 20% of all claims were for policies in low-risk communities.  Floods cost an average of $3 billion in annual losses with the average Commercial claims being $75,000,000.

The American Red Cross (ARC) offers the following flood safety tips:

Stay away from flood waters.  If you come up on a flowing stream where the water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet. 

Do not try to drive on a flooded road.   If you approach a roadway that is flooded, turn around and go another way.  If you are caught on a flooded road and the water is rising rapidly, get out of the car and get to higher ground.  Most cars can be swept away by less than two of moving water.  

Keep children out of the water.  Children are curious and lack judgement about running water and contaminated water.

That’s pretty basic…so here are some less well known tips to keep you safer in a flood!

  • If you have time, secure your home. Bring in outdoor furniture. Move essential items to an upper floor.
  • Do not walk through moving water.Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.
  • Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars causing loss of control and possible stalling.
  • A foot of water will float many vehicles.
  • After a Flood 

  • Listen for news reports to learn whether the community’s water supply is safe to drink.
  • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car. 
  • Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals. Call SERVPRO of Union, Towns, Fannin & Gilmer Counties to help with cleanup, we have the equipment and expertise to restore your home to it's former glory. 
  • Flood Safety Tips

    4/28/2016 (Permalink)

    Even though we live in the mountains, there is the potential for flooding. Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. The most dangerous type of flood, a flash flood, happens quickly with little or no warning. Just ask the people who live in Gilmer County who experienced flooding in early August--or the people in Union County who experienced flooding in early July.



    Here are some tips provided by ready.gov to keep you safe during floods:

  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely. You and the vehicle can be swept away quickly.
  • Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage.
  • If your property suffers flood damage, clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwaters can contain sewage and chemicals.
  • National Preparedness Month

    4/28/2016 (Permalink)

    SERVPRO Industries, Inc. is once again proud to be a member of the National Preparedness Month Coalition and is committed to helping the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to promote the importance of preparedness planning.

    What does it mean to be prepared?

    For FAMILIES, it means households have an emergency supply kit so they can be self-reliant for at least three days in case of emergency, and they have a plan for how they will respond and reconnect after an emergency.

    For BUSINESSES, it means employers have planned for how they will survive a disaster; they've backed up critical information, developed a plan for assisting employees on site, established a call tree to account for employees, and identified back-up sources of power and supplies.

    For SCHOOLS, it means schools and districts have developed, implemented, and communicated crisis plans.

    Being prepared means staying informed, knowing how to get information and alerts from local ememrgency management agencies, and understanding the specific risks in your community and preparing against them.